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 Centrosome behaviour in live larval neuroblasts
Centrosome behaviour during asymmetric division of a Drosophila larval neuroblast.
Recording of the pericentriolar material marker Cnn-GFP reveals that a single spot (arrowhead), located apically, can be seen for most of the cell cycle until, shortly before mitosis, a second spot (arrow) appears at the basal side of the cell. This second spot grows to a size similar to the apical one and, after division, it is inherited by the GMC. The spot that remains in the neuroblast then splits into two that migrate to the apical cortex, where one of them disappears, and is not seen again until late when it reappears at a basal position before the onset of mitosis.
Unequal centrosome behaviour during asymmetric division of a Drosophila larval neuroblast.
The centriolar marker YFP-Asl reveals the position of the two centrosomes all thoughout the cell cycle. During mitosis, each centrosome is located at each spindle pole , one apical and the other basal. After division, the centrosome inherited by the daughter neuroblast splits into two that migrate to the apical cortex, opossite to the clusted of daughter GMCs. From then on, one centrosome remains fixed at an apical position while the other moves extensively all over the cytoplasm until, eventually, it gets stabilised at the basal side of the cell where it will form the basal spindle pole. Upon division this moving centrosome is inherited by the GMC.
Unequal centrosome behaviour during asymmetric division of a Drosophila larval neuroblast.
The trajectories described by the marker YFP-Asl has been tracked in green for the apical centrosome and in blue for the basal centrosome over two consecutive cell cycles. The resulting trajectories reveal the differences of movement displayed by the two unequally behaving centrosomes.
Unequal centrosome behaviour during asymmetric division of a Drosophila larval neuroblast.
The centrosomes, as revealed by the YFP-Asl marker, has been tracked at a high temporal resolution during a complete cell cycle, and the resulting trajectories outlined in green for the apical centrosome and in blue for the basal centrosome. The details in the movement of the basal-bound centrosome can be observed in this movie.
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